Adelaide Kids' World-Record Painting Attempt To Help Charity

Adelaide Kids’ World-Record Painting Attempt To Help Charity

Adelaide will attempt to break a world record, inviting thousands of children to contribute to a gigantic painting at the Come Out Children’s Festival’s Big Family Weekend on 23 and 24 May.

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Come Out Festival

Adelaide will attempt to break a world record, inviting thousands of children to contribute to a gigantic painting at the Come Out Children’s Festival’s Big Family Weekend on 23 and 24 May.

South Australian based company Jellybeanstreet is urging South Australians to be part of history in the making and beat the current painting record of 2,263 people set by FXX Networks in the United States for a series of The Simpsons in 2014.

The painting will be used by Jellybeanstreet to create a final artwork that will be published and sold online, with profits donated to the Women’s and Children’s Foundation.

Jellybeanstreet runs finger painting workshops for children across Australia that result in amazing works of art that help children’s charities, brighten up walls and unleash toddlers’ creativity.

“This will be like a gigantic workshop for us and it will be a privilege to turn the final product into a unique piece of artwork to support the Women and Children’s Foundation and the amazing work they do,” Jellybeanstreet’s Marisa March said.

An enormous canvas will be laid out on the Terrace at the Festival Centre with children and adults invited to dip their fingers in paint and contribute to the Guinness Book of Records attempt between 10am and 3pm on both days.

Marisa said the project was an extension of Jellybeanstreet’s work which turned children’s finger paintings into works of art with up to 60% of profits from each canvas print sold going to a charity nominated by the child artist’s family with children able to receive royalties from artwork as well. Already 60 charities are involved with the number growing daily.

Marisa founded Jellybeanstreet with her husband, Ian, in 2013 and the company has quickly spread throughout Australia, even reaching as far away as Canada and the United States.

Marisa said the idea was born when her husband created artwork from her son’s finger painting as a Mother’s Day gift.

“People fell in love with the canvas and wanted to know who the artist was. They were blown away when they realised Ian had based the work on our son’ finger painting,” she said.

“Good quality, contemporary, affordable artwork is hard to find and while family and friends of children love the results, our canvasses are now being bought and displayed in hotels, restaurants, doctors’ waiting rooms and in lounge rooms across Australia.

“We’ve had children participate in our workshops who are sick themselves or people simply want to help out a charity that has given so much back to a child they know.

“We hear so many moving stories and it’s wonderful to be involved in a business that is brightening up so many lives in different ways.”

As well as canvasses – the largest standard size measuring 1×1.5m metres with customised options available – artwork can be turned into greeting cards, posters and even iphone cases.

To find out more about Jellybean Street visit www.jellybeanstreet.com

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