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Adelaide’s collective best rock the house

The Adelaide Music Collective is making a name for itself as a powerhouse of musical talent, the caliber of which is impressive to say the least.

The Goodwood Institute, current home of the collective, hosted the second of its regular sessions on Friday 16 May and there wasn’t a crowd member that went home disappointed.

 

1798692_294835823999325_189441474_nAdelaide Music Collective Sessions- Goodwood Institute 16 May

The Adelaide Music Collective is making a name for itself as a powerhouse of musical talent, the caliber of which is impressive to say the least.

The Goodwood Institute, current home of the collective, hosted the second of its regular sessions on Friday 16 May and there wasn’t a crowd member that went home disappointed. Hosted by Adelaide funnyman Dave Flanagan, the brainchild of music identity Enrico ‘Mick ‘ Morena was a sellout occasion and showed just how much Adelaide leads the way musically in Australia.

Formerly a hangout for Mods named the Oxford Club, the Goodwood Institute has had many incarnations over the years but its role as a music venue was perhaps meant to be. Here to get on stage and work their magic were some of Adelaide’s finest talent, and equally as amazing were the inductees into the accompanying SA Music Hall Of Fame, for those who have contributed greatly to the State’s music culture.

Dave Flanagan’s self deprecating humour had the audience in stitches from the start, and was the perfect choice for setting the pace.

Barmera native and winemaker turned musician, Kelley Menhennet along with Piano Accordion player Richard Coates, delivered a soulful and sometimes blues/folk laden set which was somber yet at the same time powerful. Menhennet’s depth and gentleness was moving, and her final song ‘Small Dreams’ captured the uniqueness of our amazing State and what makes us love it so much in a song that could only be described as poignant

Adelaide Bluegrass/Folk/Mayhem gurus The Timbers were next, and went hell for leather with a pulsating blend of Banjo, Trumpet, Mandolin and Guitar that certainly got the crowd’s attention. The harmonies and music were solid, tight, and proved that these guys are one of the better live performances you’ll get to see. They are most definitely an act to go see if you haven’t done so already. Take a look at what we thought of their gig the following night at Jade Monkey here!

After a short interval it was time to induct six legends of South Australian music into the AMC SA Music Hall Of Fame, an award which recognises the contributions of individuals throughout over many years and the legacy that they have created. In a casual, lounge room setting hosted by David ‘Daisy’ Day, each inductee spoke for a few moments on their career, some more than others, but nonetheless it was a fantastic glimpse into our music history and also provided numerous snapshots of musical days gone by.

The first inductee, 60’s icon Barry McAskill, spoke of his days with the Fabulous Drifters in a funny recollection of anecdotes and stories including his 18-month long party at Sydney’s Whiskey Au Go-Go during the 60’s.

The Brewster Brothers (Rick & John) of The Angels gave insights into their musical lineage, with a strong presence of concert pianists in their family which probably explains their musical excellence. They also made mention of former band mate Doc Neeson, and quelled any rumours of a supposed rift between them- there simply isn’t!

John Schumann spoke of how he identified with Henry Lawson, not because both were literary geniuses, but because he thought both were ‘pisspots and fuckups’! He also mentioned how their album ‘Caught In The Act’ became a hit after the band had disbanded and he was broke.

Ray O’Connor from Penny Rockets spoke briefly but candidly, and then Rockin’ Rob Riley enjoyed a testimonial from Kevin Borich and told stories of how he convinced Jimmy Barnes he could play Mandolin…but actually couldn’t so he told Barnesy that the Mandolin was buggered.

All six inductees were presented with medallions by ‘Daisy’ and will have their names permanently inscribed on a Roll Of Honour board at the Hall Of Fame.

It was time to party again, so Barry, Jan and Tarrin McAskill got up on stage and played a short set, with the big man looking resplendent in his Leopard print suit (which I’d kill to own!) and then the Brewster Brothers came on stage to perform several acoustic songs including ‘Love Takes Care Of It’s Own’, co-written with Doc Neeson many years ago. But, the original guys from The Angels weren’t letting us off that quietly, with Enrico Morena manning the drums and John’s son Sam playing bass during Angels songs including ‘Take a Long Line’ and Marseilles’.

Morena was in his element on drums as was the younger Brewster on bass, Rick’s solos still had that distinctive ‘Angels’ siren-like clamor whilst John held his own on vocals until the show finished.

It was a showcase of Adelaide’s best, both past and present, and as much as we didn’t want the night to end it had to. The AMC is only in it’s early days yet, but if tonight’s show is anything to go by then we are in for some seriously brilliant sessions.

The good news is that there will be another AMC Session on July 11, where John Swan and Jim Keays will be the next icons to strut their stuff.

Congratulations must go to Enrico Morena for his vision, and David Day for assembling the collection of memorabilia on display at the venue.

This is an initiative that is long-needed. Well may we say- long live rock and roll!

Reviewed by Darren Hassan

 

 

 

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