Book Review: Surviving Year 12 (revised edition), by Michael Carr-Gregg and Elly Robinson • Glam Adelaide

Book Review: Surviving Year 12 (revised edition), by Michael Carr-Gregg and Elly Robinson

SELF-HELP: Australia’s leading adolescent psychologist gives advice on how parents can help their child cope with the pressure of year 12.

By
There are no new revelations in this book and the target audience seems to be muddled.
Overall
2

Dr Michael Carr-Gregg is a high-profile psychologist in Australia and has written fourteen books. He specialises in the parent/family/child relationship space, is passionate about incorporating technology as a strategic tool to manage one’s mental health and, founded cancer support group CanTeen. Co-author Elly Robinson specialises in bridging the gap between evidence and practice in mental health services. Currently a Senior Practice Design Specialist at the Parenting Research Centre, she formerly worked at the Australian Institute of Family Studies for over a decade.

Together, these insightful authors bring you a “fully revised and updated edition” of Surviving Year 12 but there are no new revelations in this book and the target audience seems to be muddled. It sometimes feels like it is a re-write of a book originally designed for teenagers. At other times it becomes more about advising parents what to do and what habits their teenager should be adopting. This in turn seems to feel more suitable for parents of young teenagers as a sort of preparation about how to ensure a successful year twelve in the years to come, not parents of current year twelve students.

The book may also be suitable for stressed parents who want to know how to support a teen who is not coping with the final years of school or, for those parents needing to put their own expectations into perspective as it includes some statistical data on teen mental health, includes advice on dealing with the anxiety and stress of their final school year, how to set realistic goals, how to study, and the impact of technology or ‘space’ on one’s study.

It would also be useful for a teenager to be reading the tips listed in the areas of nutrition, study habits, exercise, sleep and technology however, whether they would agree to it is another matter! Most of this information is generic in nature anyway, and is either common knowledge or the type of information that is easily found in the news – for example, how much sleep a child should be getting, how and what types of food they should be eating, and so on.

Reviewed by Rebecca Wu

Distributed by: Penguin Books Australia
Released: January 2020
RRP: $22.99

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