Displaying the importance of good design • Glam Adelaide

Displaying the importance of good design

The Design Institute of Australia (SA Branch)’s first event in its Snap, Crackle and Speak breakfast series for 2011 in early March teed off with two of Adelaide’s leading designers discussing product displays.

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The Design Institute of Australia (SA Branch)’s first event in its Snap, Crackle and Speak breakfast series for 2011 in early March teed off with two of Adelaide’s leading designers discussing product displays.

New York-based designer Tim Myers, who grew up in the Adelaide Hills, is creative designer for LIV Design, who design window sets for the fashion world, with clients including Valentino, Ralph Lauren, Dolce & Gabbana and Missoni.

But Tim sometimes gets a lot more creativity with clients including Tory Burch. Here, he conceptualises a design, presents it to Tory and her team, and organises the implementation and installation of the project.

“A consistent element of my approach to working with this client is in material choice, finding ways to use materials in unexpected ways,” he said. Paper, staples, thumbtacks, nails, LiteBrites all form part of the equation.

On the side, he works as a freelance fine artist. He recently exhibited a solo show at Pelavin Gallery in New York City, where he explored his sense of order and interest in putting paint on the end of pencil pieces.

In Adelaide is jewellery design designer/makers Nicholas Pike Jewellers. Owner/operators Nicholas Pike and his wife Helen opened their first gallery in suburban Adelaide over 30 years ago and enjoyed the high speed exposure of street frontage. Now located in Burnside Village, the premises gave them pedestrian traffic and received a Royal Institute of Architects award.

Designed by Grieve Gillett Pty Ltd, the emphasis has moved from shopfront tableau to showcase displays.

The jewellery is laid out in a procession of displays along the north facade of the tenancy. A short distance away is a second layer of displays along the internal wall, drawing people into the gallery.

Architect Grieve Gillett said “the atmosphere is calm and unhurried, the restrained materials and simple forms allow the jewellery to act as the focus. The cabinetry is detailed to allow a variety of display formats and facilitate both secure display and the close inspection of individual pieces.”

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