The Grand Budapest Hotel

Film Review: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Director Wes Anderson is a comedic maverick and his latest film also benefits from his masterful touch, with an all-star cast and zingy one-liners.

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The Grand Budapest HotelDirector Wes Anderson is a comedic maverick. Overseeing films of high quality such as Rushmore and Moonrise Kingdom, you never know what to expect.

This ability to provide surprises is what has kept his works fresh and keenly anticipated. The Grand Budapest Hotel is the latest to benefit from his masterful touch. Packed with his usual all-star cast and zingy one-liners, it’s another classic production in his pantheon of fine movies.

Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes) is a popular concierge at the busy Grand Budapest Hotel. Assisted by lobby boy Zero (Tony Revolori), he ensures the hotel runs like clock-work. His high ideals become unstuck when he is involved in an art theft and a battle over a family fortune. Under suspicion, Gustave tries to clear his good name. This is easier said than done when a cavalcade of characters make his time at the hotel one of constant irritation than relaxation.

The Grand Budapest Hotel lives up to its name by being a grand and quirky ride. A character-driven film, its ensemble of peculiar personalities ensures the witty comedy always lingers. From Gustave’s many foibles to those he meets, its easy comparing them to everyday people. Gustave endures a wild time and one that’s enjoyable to witness. Anderson knows how a comedy should move with Budapest gliding a mile a minute with its frantic humour.

He also enables you to be fully consumed in this odd world with some amazing production design. It sparkles just as much as the droll dialogue as the colour bursts in technicolour glory. Sometimes it threatens to overwhelm the story although the plot is strong enough to continually grip. The all-star cast are clearly having a great time bringing Budapest to dazzling life with some perfectly pitched performances.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is a lot of fun and one of Anderson’s best works. His consistency in providing authentic laughs is always welcome with a stay at this strange hotel one anyone should make time for.

Reviewed by Patrick Moore

Rating out of 10:  8

The Grand Budapest Hotel opens 10 April 2014

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