Fringe Review: Abyss

The topics of passion and sin play a significant part in Mad/ Dan Productions latest work Abyss. A group of local choreographers and dancers, under the fine direction of Daniel Maley and Maddy Macera, take a challenging and daring journey through some of the darker elements of the human psyche to discuss how universal character flaws like lust and gluttony have a place in modern society.

By
Passion and sin explored in contemporary dance
Overall
4.5

Reviewed at the Goodwood Institute Theatre on 8 March 2019

Presented by Mad/Dan Productions

The topics of passion and sin play a significant part in Mad/ Dan Productions latest work Abyss. A group of local choreographers and dancers, under the fine direction of Daniel Maley and Maddy Macera, take a challenging and daring journey through some of the darker elements of the human psyche to discuss how universal character flaws like lust and gluttony have a place in modern society.

Taking influence from classic works including none other than Dante’s Inferno, the show in unashamedly base and explorative. Dante’s work was instrumental to the development of the western world’s imagery and interpretation of heaven, purgatory and hell and all three are clearly identifiable in the choreography of this show.

Maddy, herself a performer in the show, along with Amelia Walmsley, Connor Gibson and Rebecca Egan are relentless in their physical representation of emotional and physical states as diverse as violence, desperation, hope and desire. Among many of the strong emotional states in which the show finds itself, to this reviewer Abyss always felt just a little bit dangerous. Whether it’s the natural desire not to question if humans can be this devilish or ignoble, or perhaps for the audience to recognise that the low states of mind that writers such as Dante describe are entirely human, the audience finds it difficult to ignore that the topics the show addresses are not fanciful or exaggerated.

Without question the entire company are skilled, competent, and must be commended for tackling some challenging topics. The cast clearly work seamlessly with each other, dominating the space and putting the themes of the show in context whether it be work, sex or social interaction. A brilliant, thoroughly moving and audacious piece of work.

Reviewed by Simon Lancione

Venue:  Main Theatre at Goodwood Institute Theatre
Season:  9th, 10th March 2019
Duration:  45 mins
Tickets:  $15 – $25

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