Fringe Review: The Forgettory

A woman who can’t sleep mulling over memories with a bottle of wine thinks of her Grandfather on the other side of the world, lost in his own forgotten world. This piece is thoughtful, emotive and sad. Dealing with dementia is never easy and when your family commitments take you far away from the loved one who is suffering, the distance can make it surreal.

By
Deals with Dementia sensitively
Overall
5

Reviewed at the Bakehouse on 20 February 2019

Presented by Tracy Crisp

A woman who can’t sleep mulling over memories with a bottle of wine thinks of her Grandfather on the other side of the world, lost in his own forgotten world. This piece is thoughtful, emotive and sad. Dealing with dementia is never easy and when your family commitments take you far away from the loved one who is suffering, the distance can make it surreal.

Only able to visit at intervals, months apart, she is confronted by a person who does not remember how long or how often she visits but lives in a world that is unchanging for them. In a series of monologues Tracy Crisp delivers tales of her family and remembrances of times and places past with sensitivity and warmth.

Crisp not only performs this production, directed by Maggie Wood, but is also the writer. Last year she gave us her play-writing debut in Pearls, a different tack for this novelist but she is back for this year’s Fringe.

Reviewed by Fran Edwards
Twitter: @franeds

Venue: Studio at the Bakehouse
Season:  20 -23 Feb
Duration:  60 min
Tickets:  $20 -$27
Bookings:

 

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