Homegrown Charity ‘The Good Fight’ Is Paving The Way For Mental Health Conversations

For Ebony-Rose Philcox and Alli Evans, June 8 is the reason their mental health charity, The Good Fight, is what it is.

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June 8 is an insignificant date to many of us. It’s another day in the calendar, another day of Winter, another day to go to work and come home again. 

For Ebony-Rose Philcox and Alli Evans, June 8 is the reason their mental health charity, The Good Fight, is what it is.  

This year, June 8 marked 365 days since Philcox tried to end her life. 

Philcox is no stranger to mental health, having experienced depressive states in her teenage years, for which she began seeing a psychologist. 

Last year, Philcox says her mental health took a turn for the worse. In this period, she lost her job, dropped out of sport, and stopped attending university.

Philcox says she distanced herself from her friendship group so much so, she felt as though she no longer had anyone. She started experiencing panic psychotic episodes, in which she would physically injure herself. Throughout these episodes, Philcox describes blacking out, not remembering what had happened or what she had said, or done. 

On June 8, Philcox attempted to end her life. 

According to lifeline, suicide remains the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44. It is estimated that each and every day, at least eight Australian lives are lost as a result of suicide, whilst a further thirty people attempt to end their lives. 

On June 8, 2018, Philcox was, thankfully, in the surviving thirty. 

Ebony-Rose Philcox

Since that day, Philcox has received a Bipolar Disorder II diagnosis, which involves hypomania but does not present with the typical mania that Bipolar Disorder l does. With the support of her family, partner Alli Evans, and medical professionals, Philcox has been able to manage her condition with medication. 

After June 8, Philcox and Evans co-founded The Good Fight, a not-for-profit clothing company, with all proceeds donated to mental health research.

According to Philcox, the primary goal is for the clothes made to become conversation starters, so people begin speaking to each other. The aim is for people to understand that those wearing The Good Fight clothing support their family, friends and community. Wearers of The Good Fight know that mental health conditions are prevalent in our society, and are open to having the conversation. That all important, all too often neglected conversation. 

As well as continuing The Good Fight (their latest line has just dropped), Philcox is about to start her Masters of Education, specialising in Mental Health and Wellbeing. She says she wants to better equip herself with the knowledge needed to make a positive change in the community.

One day, Philcox would like to see The Good Fight take a step further, for the money to be used to create an educational program focused on mental health, to perhaps be implemented in high schools.  

Ebony-Rose Philcox and Alli Evans

Then, there’s June 8. That very special, very significant date that means something incredible for Philcox and Evans, and who knows how many others. 

June 8 is now Yellow Day.

In Philcox’s words, Yellow Day marks 365 days since she decided to say yes to life, to celebrate, to love, and to try again. 

To keep on keeping on. 

The Good Fight’s Summer clothing line can be ordered now.

Shop here: https://www.thegoodfight.com.au

Follow The Good Fight on Facebook to keep up to date.

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