Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower • Glam Adelaide

Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Stephen Chbosky, author of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, chose to adapt this modern classic on growing up for the screen, and thus created a moving tale of love, hope, fear and loss – and most significantly, the friends who help us through life.

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Stephen Chbosky, author of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, chose to adapt this modern classic on growing up for the screen, and thus created a moving tale of love, hope, fear and loss – and most significantly, the friends who help us through life.

The angst of growing up is explored in Chbosky's touching tale through a trio of teens growing up in an upmarket Pittsburgh high school. Following roles in Riding In Cars With Boys and The Butterfly Effect, Logan Lerman plays leading character, the shy, fifteen year old Charlie.

About to start his freshman year, Charlie is still mourning the death of his best friend, Michael, who committed suicide. Finding the growth issue during highschool awkward and painful at this change in life, he starts writing to a pen-pal, sharing his hopes, fears and longings with them.

English teacher Mr Anderson (Paul Rudd) recognises and encourages Charlie's writing talent, with his confidence rising after meeting Patrick (Ezra Miller) and his stepsister Sam (Emma Watson). The two seniors take the struggling freshman under their wings as he learns joy and pain of growing up.

This team of supporting actors definitely makes this movie even more attractive. Emma Watson completely rids her Harry Potter character Hermoine Granger in her deep and sympathetic character Sam. Where Ezra Miller who plays her stepbrother Patrick, is a standout with a sparkling screen presence as Patrick, who puts up a bold front to bury his doubts and fears.

I love the comparison that many of us over 20s and over 30s will appreciate from this movie, where how it reminds us of when growing up was about making people we liked a mix tape, over requesting their friendship on Facebook, with tne line "We accept the love we think we deserve" resonating through.

Wallflower is clearly an autobiographical piece, being such an honest look at youth. The "wallflowers" like Charlie will connect with this and understand it; the story reminding us just how hard life can be when you're young.

4/5 stars

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